Europe Looks To Dublin

This originally appeared in BCN issue 60.


In June 2001, the first European Bisexual Conference (EBC1) was held in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. At that conference, it was decided to make EBC a biennial event. The second European Bisexual Conference (EBC2) is to be held in Dublin from July 4th to 6th, 2003. This weekend ties in with the Dublin Pride celebrations, guaranteeing an exciting and action packed weekend for all who attend.

The conference is being organised by Bi Irish, a Dublin-based group founded in 1996 for bisexuals and any individuals interested in bisexuality or sexuality in general. EBC2 is open to all, regardless of sexual orientation or sexual preference, and in fact seeks to increase dialogue and discussion amongst members of the queer and straight communities. The conference will be a place to exchange information and experience in the areas of freedom of sexual preference and the position of bisexuality within societies across Europe, and also aims to improve bisexual visibility at the European level.

The conference theme “Loving the Difference” stresses the diversity of sexuality in general and bisexuality in particular. The cultural and social contexts of sexuality are tantamount to our understanding of humans, and these contexts include race and class. By offering a rich and varied programme, ranging from informal workshops, through to discussion groups, through to more formal presentations, EBC2 promises to be an interesting and rewarding experience for anyone who is involved with their (bi)sexual identity. However, the conference programme will not consist solely of discussions and talks. There is also a busy social programme, including of course the Dublin Pride parade and celebrations.

The organizing committee of EBC2 is looking for people who would like to do a session at the conference, which can be a presentation, panel discussion, workshop or performance. While they will consider any proposal submitted, it is felt

that the following subjects may have particular appeal:

  • Academic (research, theory, place of in queer studies etc)
  • Activism (organisation; computer/internet; regional/racial/cultural/class differences)
  • Sexuality, relationships and health (sexuality; relationships; differing ability; love and romance; health, including safe sex/HIV)
  • Art and media (film and video; writers/literature; performance; bisexuals in media/culture/history)
  • Lifestyle (spirituality; personal growth/development)
  • Youth and family
  • Gender and sexual identities